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Testicular cancer spelled out with plastic letters.

Erectile Dysfunction after Testicular Cancer: Viagra Can Help

Testicular cancer takes a toll on sexual function in patients undergoing treatment and in the years after treatment as well. Viagra and other erectile dysfunction medications may be able to help. 

The American Cancer Society estimates that 9,560 new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed in 2019. According to the society, roughly 410 men will die from this form of cancer in the year ahead.

While statistics indicate that the incidence of this cancer is low, striking only 1 in every 250 males, the statistics are little comfort to the men who actually develop testicular cancer.

Hits Men in Their Sexual Prime

Worse yet, the typical age at which men are diagnosed with this cancer is 33, an age at which men are in their sexual prime and often the fathers of young children.

Not surprisingly, testicular cancer takes a toll on male sexual function, both physiologically and psychologically. A recent study conducted by researchers at Italy’s Sapienza University of Rome compared various aspects of sexual function in 241 testicular patients with those in a similar number of men who were free of cancer.

Sexual Function Assessed

Sexual function was evaluated in both groups on the basis of data gathered from responses to the International Index of Erectile Function-15 questionnaire. The questionnaire was first administered at baseline, which for cancer patients was after the surgical removal of one or both cancerous testicles but before chemotherapy. It was subsequently administered 6 months, 12 months, 18 months, 24 months, 48 months, and 96 months after chemotherapy.

In addition to erectile function, men in both the testicular cancer and control groups were evaluated for orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction. Researchers found that men who had undergone treatment for testicular cancer scored consistently lower in all aspects of sexual function than men in the control group.

Some Improvement Noted

However, researchers did note that testicular cancer patients did begin to show some improvement in erectile function beginning 12 months after chemotherapy, although no noticeable improvement occurred in other aspects of sexual function.

In the conclusion to their study, which was published in the April 2019 issue of Frontiers in Endocrinology, the Italian researchers said it was clear that testicular cancer and its treatment have a significant effect on sexual function. However, in the absence of significantly different hormonal levels between cancer patients and the control group, they theorize that the impact is due “to the surgical procedure itself or to the psychological impact of a cancer diagnosis.”

Another Study Weighs In

Yet another study, this one published in a late 2018 issue of Practice Update: Urology, found that the impact of bilateral testicular cancer and its treatment was not significantly different from that of unilateral testicular cancer.

Meanwhile, Viagra and the other oral erectile dysfunction drugs known as PDE5 inhibitors can provide at least temporary relief for testicular cancer patients who are experiencing difficulty in getting and keeping an erection. Available only by prescription, these drugs temporarily improve blood flow to the penis, thus facilitating the erection process.

If the convenience of ordering these drugs online appeals to you, check out the many services available from eDrugstore.com, a longtime online facilitator. To learn more, visit its Erectile Dysfunction page.

Don Amerman has spent more than three decades in the business of writing and editing. During the last 15 years, his focus has been on freelance writing. For almost all of his writing, He has done all of his own research, both online and off, including telephone and face-to-face interviews where possible. Don Amerman on Google+